7 Reasons to Actually Start Using Google Keep

7 Reasons to Actually Start Using Google Keep

Productivity
Google's note-taking app is the best free program you're not using and perhaps never knew existed in the first place. Let's talk about Google Keep. You remember Google Keep, right? It was supposed to revolutionize taking and organizing notes in 2013, but it's faced a lot of competition. There are, of course, plenty of productivity and organizational apps that will help you shepherd your life across multiple devices. Evernote may be a PCMag Editors' Choice for note-taking apps, but Keep has its benefits as a free, minimalist tool that simplifies the process of sharing ideas across multiple devices. For example, you can jot down notes in Keep on your Android or iOS device while in transit, and pick it up later on your computer. Or, conversely, when you're about to…
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What is Google Analytics Fastbase and do I need it?

What is Google Analytics Fastbase and do I need it?

Business
If you have a Google Analytics account, you may have heard of the Google Analytics Fastbase, but what exactly is it? Well, it’s a Google Analytics add-on that touts itself as helping you “identify your web traffic into real business contacts.” It gives specific information about the businesses that are sending visitors to your website. For B2B companies that have a robust sales force, and time to look up potential leads, this is a great tool. Here’s what you need to know about Google Analytics Fastbase: 1. It gives you (some) company names. Fastbase lists the business names that sent visitors to your website, but there are some limitations. For example, if I work for XYZ university and I come to your website, it will show that university as the…
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Forty years of the internet: how the world changed for ever

Forty years of the internet: how the world changed for ever

Business, Internet, The Web
Towards the end of the summer of 1969 – a few weeks after the moon landings, a few days after Woodstock, and a month before the first broadcast of Monty Python's Flying Circus – a large grey metal box was delivered to the office of Leonard Kleinrock, a professor at the University of California in Los Angeles. It was the same size and shape as a household refrigerator, and outwardly, at least, it had about as much charm. But Kleinrock was thrilled: a photograph from the time shows him standing beside it, in requisite late-60s brown tie and brown trousers, beaming like a proud father. Had he tried to explain his excitement to anyone but his closest colleagues, they probably wouldn't have understood. The few outsiders who knew of the box's…
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